5 books to get you through isolation

Hi I’m Jini and I’m a first year English student.

As we all know, it’s been a crazy couple of weeks. I’m sure we’ve all heard it a million times by now but just as a reminder, in keeping with NHS guidelines, it is imperative that we all, young and old, practice social distancing, self isolation and quarantining where necessary in order to stop the spread of this virus and return back to our normal lives as soon as possible. But of course doing the right thing isn’t always easy and staying indoors for such a long period of time can be very hard for most of us. With most schools out for the term, we’ve got a lot of free time on our hands, a great period to reflect on the year so far, pick up a new hobby, connect with our friends and family…. At this time it’s really important that we try to come up with fun, innovative ways to keep busy, keep healthy and keep active while also getting the sufficient amounts of rest I’m sure we all need.

As an English student, social distancing has been a good period for me to catch up on all my school reading in a far less pressured, more casual setting, where I don’t have to worry about pesky deadlines and quizzes from tutors. I’ve also been able to add in a few pleasure reads which have been on my radar for a while as a relaxed form of leisure to fit into random pockets during my day. Not to sound like a pre-school teacher, but reading really is such a great way to fill up your time while stimulating your brain, expanding your vocabulary and still a wonderful form of entertainment. And so, for all my fellow booklovers out there I thought it’d be a good idea to make a short list of some great books I’ve recently gotten into, and would highly recommend you dive into during this isolation period.


1. Mo’ Meta Blues by Ahmir ‘Questlove’ Thompson

This one’s for the music junkies and hip hop heads. An amazing autobiography written by none other than lead drummer of the legendary hip hop band, The Roots, this light-hearted read delves into the music connoisseur’s artistic journey with insightful reviews, hilarious anecdotes and more somber reflective moments. Mo’ Meta Blues is the type of book you can keep dropping and picking up again and never get bored of. An interactive read with a narrator who feels like an old friend, it really draws you in from the first page.


2. The Informers by Bret Easton Ellis

A heavier read, this page-turner by the ‘American Psycho’ author American writer chronicles the voices of the 1980s Los Angeles’ upper class teenagers and their parents. Written in form of interconnected short stories, ‘The Informers’ is a dark, nihilist’s satire of the pretentious of the elitist lifestyle. Mysterious and pensive, it is a story which stays with you long after you’ve turned the last page.


3. A Very Large Expanse of Sea by Tahereh Mafi

Some would love to deny it but deep down everyone’s a sucker for a good romance novel. This period piece set in the aftermath of the 9/11 American terrorist attacks is focused on two high school teenagers from different cultural backgrounds navigating first love in a tumultuous period. Mafi teaches us the importance of acceptance and sacrifice, and forces us to question just how big of a part stereotypes actually play in our everyday lives. In our current times, this is a book which is as relevant as ever.


4. Warcross by Marie Lu

Another young adult read, Warcross is the dystopian thriller you won’t want to put down. In a futuristic society where a virtual game is the world’s biggest obsession, teenage hacker

Emika cracks the code and is thrust into a whirlwind adventure which sees her becoming one of the game’s top competitors and uncovering a conspiracy that could potentially turn the entire Warcross phenomenon on its head. And if a fierce female protagonist with amazing character development isn’t enough to draw you in, the refreshing minority representation in this just might.


5. On Love by Charles Bukowski

A poetry collection by the reclusive Beat Generation writer pegged as ‘The Dirty Old Man of America’ and known for the mundane intimacy of his work and cynical subject matter, this collection deals with the complications and exaltations of love, in all its forms. It is a representation of its author; erratic, random and fragmented in ites expressions of love, lust, desire and family and yet brutally honest and reflective. Bukowski is not afraid to be vulnerable and flawed. This is great read for any poetry love, by delving into his mindset it makes me confront my own ideas of love and companionship.

How to look after your wellbeing during isolation

We understand that the current Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak is extremely worrying. It is easy to feel overwhelmed and that’s why we have put together a few self-care tips for you during this time. 


Look after yourself 

Whilst staying at home, it is important that you take care of yourself and try to remain as healthy as possible: 

  • Try to maintain a routine and avoid sleeping too much. 
  • Exercise daily if you are feeling well enough – there are many home workouts available online, including these from Les Mills which are free for University Sports Centre members. 
  • Try and get some fresh air outside if you are able to. 
  • Stay hydrated and eat well. BBC Good Food have many recipe ideas. 
  • Avoid ‘fake news’ about the current situation. Instead keep up to date via our webpage, Public Health England and the NHS. 
  • If social media is making you feel anxious, take a break from it. 
  • Keep your room and home clean and tidy. A clutter free environment can help towards a healthy mind. 

Supporting those around you 

We can make a big difference by supporting the people around us and showing solidarity with our community: 

  • Check your phone list and see if there’s someone you have been meaning to catch up with for a while. Now could be the time to reach out to them. 
  • Treat everyone with empathy and compassion and come together to look out for others. 


Social distancing doesn’t mean you cannot be social  

Whether you are currently in Bristol or at home, it is really important that you keep in contact with family and friends to stay positive. Here are a few ideas for you: 

  • Video call friends and/or family (e.g. during meal times so you can eat together). 
  • Netflix party is a new way for you to watch series and films with loved ones. 
  • Create a joint playlist which you can listen to with friends at the same time. 
  • Join Facebook community groups for your local area and the SU’s online Living Room.
  • Follow Government guidance about social distancing – when this is all over, there will be time to get together. 


Wellbeing support 

If you need some support, here are a few resources: 

  • If you are worried about your studies or you feel you need help managing these changes, please contact our Wellbeing teams or email coronavirus-student@bristol.ac.uk. 
  • Talk Campus is an app which enables you to speak with fellow students from around the world for instant support day and night. 
  • Big White Wall is a digital support service you can access 24/7 and talk to others anonymously. 
  • Shout (crisis messenger) offers free mental health support. Text Bristol to 85258 to be connected to a trained volunteer. 
  • Mind have lots of useful tips if you are feeling anxious. 
  • Nilaari is a culturally appropriate counselling service providing help and support for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic people.

Keep up to date 

Would you like to share your tips for self-isolation? Have you got a stay at home goal? Know any tips for exercising in small spaces? Got great recipes for tinned food? We would love to hear from you! Get in contact at student-comms@bristol.ac.uk and you could feature in our next blog. 

 

Bored during lockdown? Try baking Elaura’s homemade ginger biscuits

Hi I’m Elaura and I am a second year History student.

As the pandemic of COVID-19 has trapped us indoors for the next few weeks, we should use this time to be creative, try new things and stay productive and positive. Ginger is supposed to be good at boosting your immune system, so I’ve had a go at making some simple ginger biscuits. They’re not perfect but taste pretty good and were fun to make, so if you like you can give them a go yourself by following this recipe.

Remember to take pictures of your creation and put them on your stories with the tag #UOBBakes !


What you’ll need:

  • 100g of butter
  • 75g of light brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
  • 100g golden syrup
  • 250g self-raising flour
  • 1 ½ tbsp ground ginger
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 small egg yolk

Method:

  1. First, pre-heat your oven to 190C and line two baking trays with parchment to stop the biscuit dough from sticking.
  2. Add the butter to a saucepan and melt it over a low heat, stirring it slowly. Then add the sugar, fresh grated ginger and golden syrup to the mix and stir. Once stirred, leave to cool.
  3. In a bowl, sift the flour before added the ground ginger and bicarbonate of soda. Stir altogether.
  4. Add the mix from the saucepan into the bowl and stir. Add the egg yolk and then stir until it becomes a dough mix. TIP- If the mixture feels too runny or sticky, then add flour until it forms more of a dough texture.
  5. Place flour on a countertop and roll the dough into small balls, of equal size in the flour. Press down on the balls to make a more disk shape but not completely flat.
  6. Place the prepared balls onto the baking tray and put them in the oven for 8-10 mins. Check after 6 mins to see if they are turning golden brown.
  7. TIP- to test if the biscuits are cooked, pierce the dough with a wooden skewer and if it comes out clean they are done.
  8. Place on cooling rack after they have cooked.

 

 

University Mental Health Day 2020

On Thursday 5 March 2020, Universities from across the UK will be coming together to raise awareness of student and staff mental health for #UniMentalHealthDay.

This year, universities are working hard to make mental health a university-wide priority. To support this aim, we have organised a range of events, workshops and resources. By taking part, you are helping raise awareness of the importance of positive mental health and encouraging others to do the same.

Let’s inspire conversations, take action and create change!


Get involved

  • Bristol Wellbeing Conference (5 March 2020, 9 am-4 pm, Anson Rooms). This all day student-led event will host mindfulness activities, panel discussions, talks, workshops, and exhibitions. This conference is open to all staff, students and members of the public.
  • Share your experiences with others in a blog. Please email student-comms@bristol.ac.uk if you would like to write a blog for us.
  • Share your story and words of encouragement on social media using the hashtag #UniMentalHealthDay.


Free mental health training

  • Mentally Healthy Universities – free mental health workshops to first year and final year UG students. The University and Bristol Mind is hosting a series of free workshops designed to support you to look after your mental health while at University. Book your place here.
  • Suicide Prevention Online Training – Would you know how to approach someone who is struggling? Please take just 20 minutes to learn the skills that will enable you to approach and help those who may be having suicidal thoughts. Save a life, take the training.


Be active

  • Healthy Minds programme – Healthy Minds is a 12 week programme which aims to help students experiencing mental health difficulties through a varied and socially engaging programme of physical activity options.
  • Read about Charlotte and Ashley’s experience and how the Healthy Minds programme has supported their wellbeing through university and beyond.
  • Great Bristol 10K – The Great Bristol 10K is for everyone, from complete beginners to elite athletes. Taking part is a great way to get active and support your physical and mental health. We are offering discounted entry for students, staff and alumni when you sign up via this page.


Mental Health in Young People – students at the heart of research

‘Mental Health in Young People’ is a new research initiative, led by the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute. The initiative will look at ways to improve mental health and wellbeing for young people, with a particular focus on University students.

If you would like more information, or would like to join the Mental Health in Young People research initiative network, please contact ebi-mentalhealthyp-research@bristol.ac.uk


Mental Health and Wellbeing Survey Results

In 2018/19, many of you shared your views about mental health and wellbeing support by taking our Mental Health and Wellbeing Surveys. Your views are changing how we support your wellbeing at Bristol. Find out more.

The 2020 Wellbeing Survey will be live from 1 – 17 May. We encourage you all to share your views and help us make positive changes to student wellbeing and mental health.


Where to get help

Here at Bristol, you’re not on your own; there is always someone to talk to. We have a range of free support and services available to all students.

If you’re uncertain where to go for help,  call: +44 (0)117 45 69860, email: wellbeing-access@bristol.ac.uk, and a member of staff will be able to advise you or visit our Wellbeing webpages.

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