Top tips on applying for a scholarship

Scholarships can be a very important part of applying to university; for many students, winning a scholarship is a huge factor in where to study. This is especially true for international students, as studying overseas can be expensive.

At the University of Bristol, we understand that scholarships are invaluable and are proud to offer Think Big, our flagship scholarship scheme for talented, ambitious international students.

Scholarships are often very competitive, with many students applying for a limited number of places. This is true of the Think Big scheme, which attracts thousands of applications every year. This list of Dos and Don’ts will give you the best chance of success in your scholarship applications.

Student writing

Tip 1: DO make sure you’re answering the question

It sounds obvious, but try not to drift off-topic when you’re writing – it‘s easy to do, especially when you have lots of achievements and activities you want to talk about. For example, if a question asks specifically about recent achievements, avoid talking about your swimming certificates from a young age. Most scholarship applications have a word limit, so don’t lose valuable words talking about things that aren’t relevant.

Tip 2: DON’T focus too much on grades

The University of Bristol is a prestigious institution, and students must achieve very good grades to study here. If you have an offer to study at Bristol, we already know you have an excellent academic record. Focus on your other achievements. Have you done any volunteering or an internship that sparked your interest in your course? Tell us about it!

Tip 3: DO give yourself plenty of time to apply

While you don’t need to submit your application weeks before the deadline, starting early will give you more time to consider your answers and revisit them a few times to make them as strong as possible. You can also ask a friend or family member to proofread your answers for typographical errors or spelling mistakes. You also may write better when you’re not stressed about the deadline!

Tip 4: DON’T forget to read the website carefully

There is lots of information about University of Bristol scholarships online, just as there is for many other institutions. You don’t want to waste your time applying for a scholarship that won’t be enough to fund your studies, or that doesn’t apply to your course. Before applying, make sure you’ve read all the information.

Here is some advice from current University of Bristol scholarship winners:

‘Planning for your scholarship application in advance is very important. One must ensure that they are well versed with the university, the course they will be pursuing and how their interests fit well into this. Your answers must be unique and your lived experiences and personal development must also be portrayed.’

Photo of Zoe
Zoe, MSc International Development

‘Firstly, don’t be scared of applying. The scholarships are competitive, but you never know, you can be one of the recipients. Secondly, instead of using unnecessary words, write what describes you best. Be precise and to the point. And lastly, know that only what you write in these short essays is what you will be judged on, so give it your best shot.’

Phot of Zubair
Zubair, BSc Accounting and Finance

If you are an international applicant and you have any questions about applying for scholarships at the University of Bristol, you can contact the International Scholarships and Sponsors team at international-partnerships@bristol.ac.uk. We also recommend that you visit our international scholarship web pages to see what funding opportunities may be available to you.

My COVID-19 university experience outside of student life

I’m George and I’m studying BSc Politics and International Relations.

What volunteering I’m doing whilst studying

Whilst at university I’m volunteering as a Special Constable with our local police force, Avon and Somerset Police. In this role, I hold the same powers as a regular police officer and patrol alongside them by preventing and detecting crime to help keep the community safe. Engaging with the community through my volunteering has allowed me to engage with the wider community, which is great because I learn something new or exciting about Bristol every day. I volunteer at least 16 hours a month, however I recognise the importance of breaking the study cycle at university so often commit to more hours.

Police officers from behind
My colleague and I in Cabot Circus

How I balanced this with university life under blended learning

Under the blended learning approach, I used the best of a challenging situation to use the recorded lectures and reading requirements of my course to commit to more volunteering hours. Further, at times in the working week where I may not have been available in the past, I was able to help my local policing team, using weekends to study. My volunteering has helped me become more independent and develop my people skills. It can be hard to balance at times, but I have been learning to manage studying, social activities and volunteering under what is sometimes a stressful time.

Photo of Brandon Hill
Brandon Hill is a great place to go for a daily walk whilst in Bristol

Following the rules

While our university experience is different to what we’re all used to in the previous years, it’s for a reason. We’ve all seen the amazing work our NHS have done during the pandemic and would not want to put extra strain on our hospitals or emergency services who are having to deal with coronavirus cases. We all definitely would not want to put vulnerable members of our community at risk. So please stick to the rules and remember to social distance from course mates and other households when the lockdown period ends.

PROJECT:TALK Bristol – connecting our community in the COVID-19 pandemic

PROJECT:TALK Bristol have a mission to change the way Bristol views mental health by pioneering mental fitness. Below, members of the team tell their story of setting up PROJECT:TALK and their work to support students at Bristol during the pandemic.

PROJECT:TALK logo and committee members

George, PROJECT:TALK CIC’s co-founder and Bristol Society’s current co-president, explains how it all started

We established PROJECT:TALK as a Community Interest Company in March 2020. We set out to make it something everyone could connect with, beyond those in need of support.

Typically, mental health is only looked at in the context of mental illness. Only when things have begun to get on top of us do we start to navigate the challenges we face. At this point of need, things often seem overwhelming and a lack of resources only adds to the challenge. This shouldn’t be the case. We all experience mental health and we should all be empowered, inspired, equipped, and supported to own it.

Our work is organised into three main projects:

  • TOOLS TO:TALK takes charge of our training and peer support scheme.
  • WALK TO:TALK pioneers mental fitness through events and fundraising.
  • TIME TO:TALK takes care of our online presence and blog, which serves as a space for communities to share their experiences and ideas.
College green event
Our WALK TO:TALK event on College Green in May 2019

The very first PROJECT:TALK Society was formed in Bristol in September 2020!

Wiktoria, PROJECT:TALK Bristol Society’s newest committee member as Social Secretary explains the importance of our work in Bristol

The University of Bristol forms a crucial support network for over 27,000 students. Whilst in a key transition period in their lives, the pandemic has put all students’ mental fitness to the test. An uncertain and isolated world where lectures are online, bars are shut, and parties are forbidden has forced many to navigate mental fitness challenges like never before.

Sam, developer of our Peer Support Scheme, speaks of support during the pandemic

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we created the PROJECT:TALK Peer Support Scheme, a 1:1 supportive calling service, run by students for students. We have a team of 15 trained student volunteers, who have been providing free and confidential support for fellow peers since November.

“Volunteering with PROJECT:TALK has provided me with an outlet to have a positive impact on the wellbeing of my fellow students, at a time when it has been so easy to feel helpless.” – Peer Support Scheme volunteer.

We are now working in partnership with Queen Mary University London to set up a Peer Support Scheme for their students.

How can I access support?

If you’d like to access our range of mental fitness support in Bristol, visit our website. Our amazing volunteers are here to support you – the training they receive, their experience and similar position in life allows them to connect with our callers. We recognise that sometimes it’s hard to ask for help but students find great value in our support service.

“The scheme provided me with someone who understood my problems, in a relaxed, conversational environment” – Rob, a student who’s used our Peer Support Scheme

We’ve partnered with multiple peer support groups to form a central hub for peer led support. Every Saturday, we hold a mental fitness workout in collaboration with Talk Club Bristol Uni. We’ve also welcomed the UoB Grief, Terminal and Life Threatening Illness support group and male-identifying Talk Club group on board.

Now, more than ever, we really encourage you to reach out to those around you. Even just a simple ‘Hello, how’s your day been?” will make a huge difference!

Dog in photo frame
Our biggest fan

What else is PROJECT:TALK Bristol doing to support mental fitness at Uni?

We’ve got some really exciting stuff coming up:

  • As it’s currently difficult to travel, we’d like to take you on a cultural journey with food and drink. Our committee are working hard to organise online events with chefs from some our favorite Bristol bars and restaurants (let us know your favorites!).
  • Mental Fitness Yoga – keeping our minds and bodies active when it’s hard to get out.
  • We’re working with the Grief, life threatening and terminal illness support group to deliver therapeutic art sessions to students experiencing grief.

How can I get involved?

Join our society – you’ll get an array of perks, our monthly newsletter and even the opportunity to pioneer your own initiative! With both free and premium membership options, we want to welcome everyone into our supportive community.

Sophie, PROJECT:TALK Bristol’s marketing lead, tells us what it’s like to be part of the team

Even though I have not been a part of the community very long, I can already tell it’s the most supportive group I have seen. Not only do we want to raise awareness about mental fitness, but we also want to provide our members with activities during this hard time. We are trying to reach out and contact as many students as possible.

Where can I find out more?

Visit our website and join the University of Bristol Society. Find us on Facebook and Instagram, @projecttalkbristol.

‘It’s an exciting opportunity for anyone at the University’ : Isobel Edmondson on Global Lounge Language Café sessions

Name: Isobel Edmondson
Course: Second-year, French and Theatre
Both Language Café learner and volunteer, since the start of the 2020/21 academic year  

As a French and Theatre student, I always intended on attending the Global Lounge’s weekly Language Café sessions during my first year of UniversityI’m now in my second year, and while it still takes place every Wednesday afternoon, the venue is pretty different! Instead of meeting at a physical space, we move freely between virtual tables on a platform called Remo, communicating through cameras and microphones.

‘You can leave the session feeling like you’ve achieved something (even if this just means talking to people outside of your house!)

Despite this change, the experience is as rewarding as I hoped it would be. Before I’d ever even attended Language Café, I jumped at the chance to be a volunteer — and I haven’t looked back since. I would recommend this role to anyone who wants to improve in a language and facilitate others’ learning, because it is exactly this symbiosis that makes it such a rich and unique experience. I really appreciate the friendly and relaxed environment that everyone helps create. Whether you’re a volunteer or an attendee, it’s a space where you can make mistakes and still leave the session feeling like you’ve achieved something (even if this just means talking to people outside of your house!). 

‘It is an exciting opportunity for anyone at the University to meet new people and assist others’

I’m sure most people would prefer in-person interaction, but I believe that the Language Café team have made a great effort to simulate the original café experience and are always present to help with any difficulties we might experience. With a large variety of languages to engage in including (but not limited to) French, Japanese, Cantonese, Hindi, Spanish, British Sign Language, and English — it is an exciting opportunity for anyone at the University to meet new people and assist others in their language-learning journey. I also appreciate that these events actively encourage the sharing of cultures, revealing the University of Bristol to be the multicultural community that it is.

‘It is these moments of natural chit-chat and straying from the topic that has made this experience so memorable for me so far’

As a non-native French speaker, leading French discussions at intermediate level has certainly been a challenge, but I am grateful for it. It makes a huge difference to the confidence I have in my French seminars and encourages me to explore topics I otherwise might not have – which is always a welcome experience (my animal kingdom vocab was very much tested in a recent session!).

Each week is different; the number of people varies (both small and large numbers having their advantages), the pre-prepared topics change from week to week and meandering from the theme is encouraged, and likely! In fact, it is these moments of natural chit-chat and straying from the topic that has made this experience so memorable for me so far. On top of this, being a Language Café volunteer makes me feel well-prepared for my year abroad next year as I intend on studying and working in Toulouse; so I will be speaking French as my primary language every day. Maybe by then I will have been to an in-person event fingers crossed!  

So, whether you think this is for you or not, I challenge you to come to at least one session this semester and see for yourself. Hope to see you there! 

Language Café runs every Wednesday, 3 pm to 4:30 pm (3 February to 24 March 2021) on Remo. Go to the listing page to find the next upcoming event and Remo link!

Search the internet and plant a tree

This blog was written by veterinary students Hannah and Elspeth. They have successfully campaigned for the University to adopt Ecosia as our default search engine on all open access computers across campus.

During a time when it is essential to make changes towards a more sustainable lifestyle, we knew the University of Bristol needed to switch to Ecosia, so our campaign started. With the University declaring a climate emergency in 2019, and committing to carbon neutrality, the move to Ecosia fits with becoming a more sustainable campus.

Ecosia is a search engine, which uses its revenue to fund tree planting in twenty different projects across the world, where trees are needed most. This not only has huge environmental benefits but also social impact for the surrounding communities. Trees absorb carbon dioxide, preventing excess greenhouse gases building up in our atmosphere, they also…

  • Improve soil health helping farmers produce food.
  • Provide an income for communities improving access to education and healthcare.
  • Maintain habitats for endangered species, especially when planted in biodiversity hotspots.

Ecosia logo

We have been using Ecosia on our own devices and feel it is an effortless way for the student body and staff members at the University of to make a worldwide contribution to improving the environment. Having gained support from students and passing our motion at the SU annual members meeting, we felt motivated to make our idea a reality. We are both incredibly excited for this change, especially for it to be launched alongside Sustainability Month at the University.

If you want to learn more about Ecosia please come along to our launch event on Tuesday 16 February at 6 pm via Zoom – check out our Facebook for more details.

To download Ecosia on your personal device and contribute to the University of Bristol tree count use this link.

Let’s see how many trees the University of Bristol can plant!

Image of Ecosia student campaign team
Hannah Rose (Campaign leader and fifth year veterinary medicine student), Fred Henderson (Ecosia Project Coordinator), Elspeth Taylor (Campaign leader and fifth year veterinary medicine student)

Meet Tony Cowley. One of the Security team helping to keep us all safe.

Keeping students and staff safe in residencies and on campus is no mean feat with a community of around 40,000 people and almost 400 buildings to care for 24/7. We talk to Tony Cowley, Security Supervisor, to clarify the role of security in residencies and why following the rules mean we’ll all be safer. 

Tell us more about your team and the different Security Services staff that students will encounter in residencies. 

I’ve been at the University for nearly two years now and I lead a team of Security Officers that provide an in-house security service across the whole university estate, which includes keeping over 370 buildings, 9 halls of residences and the students and staff therein, safe and secure, 24/7. We respond to everything from fellow student complaints to fire incidents to building access issues  no day is ever the same and dealing with such a large campus certainly keeps us busy! 

We work closely with Residential Life and Residential Facilities teams to provide an all-round service for students that respond to differing needs. As you would expect of us, we respond to matters that would be deemed a breach of student behaviour rules and regulations, which include criminality, drug use/possession, excessive noise (usually loud parties) and other anti-social behaviour. It is important that we respond accordingly and seek to reduce the harm that certain behaviours can have on the individuals involved, other students and the wider community.  But it’s equally important to remember our role in supporting our students and staff and helping to keep everyone as safe as possible. This new webpage sets out more about what you can expect from us and what we can’t do – a way to explain the relationship between Security Services and our students. 

Students may have noticed that there are also Security staff in blue or orange tabards at the halls (we are the staff in yellow and black). These are additional contract staff that have been brought in specifically to assist the residential teams with managing student gatherings that would breach government guidance and university rules around social gatherings during this pandemic.  

How can students help to keep themselves and others safe in residencies during these challenging times? 

When it comes to student behaviour and matters that might lead to disciplinary action, it’s really important for you to be aware of the rules and regulations that are helping to keep us all safe so that you can continue to live and study safely and successfully. You’ll find an overview of how students and your security team can best work together in a new agreement. So whilst at the moment you can’t have parties involving people from outside your household for example, there are still loads of virtual events and activities to explore and make new friends this way.

Keeping safe within your residences really does rely on each student playing their part to look after one anotherAs much as we would like to be, we can’t be everywhere at once, so your safety depends on you all doing your bit. All students would have received a ‘UoB: SAFE’ booklet within their induction packs at the beginning of the year, which offers advice and links to further resources.  

For all welfare and pastoral care needs, do contact your local Student Support Centre to speak to someone from Residential Life and use the wellbeing resources online.

What’s the best part of your job? 

The best part of our role here is the sheer variety of matters that we deal with, as well as the ability to help so many people within our community. We are often working in challenging conditions with limited numbers of staff, so we also need to support each other during the tough times and our teamwork ethic is key to these situationsThis couldn’t be more true as we all navigate our way through this pandemic, where we are trying our best to balance very unique situation at the halls. By all doing our bit we can help avoid further lockdown and restrictions.  

We were all really proud of our colleague Stacey who won an award for ‘Security Officer of the Year for an Outstanding Act of Courage’ a short while ago. She went beyond what was expected to manage a serious student safety issue at a halls of residence and was recognised by the Association of University Chief Security Officers (AUCSO). 

And to finish, what would you say to the students here? 

Our role is absolutely to work with you and keep our community safe. We all have a part to play in reducing the spread of the virus so thank you for sticking to the rules.  

 

Reflections as a black medical student

by Adewale Kukoyi

Reflections

During lockdown, I’ve had ample time to reflect.

To reflect on my first year at University, all the positives and negatives, the pedantic learning techniques I used and my overall perspective on Medicine. However, more profoundly, I’ve reflected on my own position, and the value I can potentially share with others from my community or background who may believe where I am is unachievable for them.

Including me, there are only six black male students in my year group of roughly 270.

As one of very few, I felt it essential to share my experiences with others from a similar background to me so that they can take the necessary steps to start their medical journey

Volunteering

The opportunity to give back arose when approached by Medic Mentality – an upcoming medical school initiative, aiming to increase representation in Medicine through mentorship services, personal statement reviews, events, and UCAT/BMAT advice. They asked me to join them on an Instagram live to discuss my experience as a Bristol medical student. Founded by Aderonke Odetunde, Maria Taiwo, Osas Ogbeide, Nehita Oviojie and Toni Oduwole (all 2nd-year medical students at UCL) aims to equip students from underprivileged backgrounds with the confidence to make the application to medical school. Despite only launching in July 2020, the scheme already has 30 mentees.

@medicmentality (Instagram)

I have also joined various organisations who work to empower younger generations through mentorship and provision of resources. I am currently a mentor with The Black Excellence Network and BME Medics Bristol Year 2 Lead. In both roles, I work with prospective medical students by providing tailor-made consultations over their applications, helping with drafts of their personal statements, and giving an insight into life at Bristol.

As well as working with prospective medical students, I also work with other current medical students, and I am an active member of the newly formed Black Medic Plexus. We are a network which prides itself in building a strong community and network for black medical students across the UK. The platform was created (and founded by the brilliant Sharon Amukamara) to create a supportive space for black medics based on community and work-life balance.

My advice

My biggest tip for black students looking to enter Medicine (or Higher Education in general!) would be to have the self-confidence to apply. There are so many mental barriers you can put yourself under, ranging from imposter syndrome (feeling of not belonging) to a lack of role-models. My advice would be to reach out to any organisations (like the ones I’m part of) for guidance, information and the belief that you are capable of excelling in your chosen field.

Finally, I would also urge any medical student to get involved and recognise the value they can exchange with others. We are in a position that is hard to access and providing any help along the way is vital in uplifting future generations.

by Adewale Kukoyi

 

Find your Support

Hi everyone! Khadija here, chair of the BME network, elected by BME students to represent BME students at a university and SU level.

Many students struggle with finding support, and in my role, I particularly find this as an issue for BME students, who often find it difficult to see how to access the university’s services. As such, I’ve become familiar with what is available, and have had some great discussions with the staff behind them already to incorporate the needs of all students, including those from racial and ethnic minorities! How to Find your Support:

1. Student Wellbeing Service

This is your first port of call if you’re struggling, and includes a range of services, from:

Student Wellbeing Advisors, who can help direct you to where you need to go.

TalkCampus app, giving you online peer-support any time of day and night.

– Self-help resources, including the FIKA Covid-19 support app, which is designed to help you learn practical mental and emotional fitness approaches which you can apply to your everyday life.

The Student Counselling Service, including a specific BAME Counselling service run by NILAARI, which the BME Network supported being expanded into the university last year.

– The uni are working with Bristol Drugs Project too and ‘The Drop’ harm reduction service. If you’re thinking about trying drugs or if drug use has become a problem, reach out via email thedrop@bdp.org.uk find them on Instagram above or call 0117 987 6000.

2. Personal Tutors

Make sure to reach out to your Personal Tutor whenever you need them, for any issues, no matter how big or small. As a network, we’ve engaged with the services to try and work on some diversity training so they can better support all students.

3. Study Skills

Check out the Study Skills online! I’ve been a medical student for 3 years, and now I’m intercalating in a Masters and having to manage my own learning far more. So I used these pages for the first time this year and found them surprisingly helpful!

4. Library Services

The Library Services are always there as a channel of support with subject librarian advice, if you have any issues finding resources and there’s a Library Support team too for accessibility. In light of COVID they have some great online resources, including the 24/7 live chat service and a great range of self help books too – their One-Stop Shop page is super helpful.

They’ve also just collaborated with the BME Network on sharing resources and books by Black authors for Black History Month, with students like yourself writing the reviews!

I’ve spotted they’re offering Online Study Lounges during October, they’re half-day events led by the Study Skills team and an opportunity to connect with other students online rather than working completely alone.

5. Students’ Union

You can become a course rep and advocate on the issues that you’re finding in your course to help feedback and represent your fellow students.

As well as this, engaging with societies and volunteering can be a great way to find friends and build your student community. I dressed up as a Banana for a week to raise money for charity as part of the Islamic society, something I never dreamed I’d be doing when I first started!

The BME Network believes in collaborating with a range of societies to create a variety of spaces to suit all needs – from large social events like festivals and cultural exchanges, to smaller more relaxed sessions like political discussion groups or wellbeing chat.

At the beginning, the range of what’s out there can feel confusing. It’s all about finding the areas you feel you belong and understanding what helps you feel good early on, so that you know where to find it in times of stress. Maybe sport is your thing? They’re part of the ‘Give it a go’ taster sessions currently running.

6. Peer Mentoring

If you’d find it helpful talking to a current student studying a similar subject to you, look into the Peer Mentoring scheme. It’s open to first year undergraduates to help you settle into uni life and nice to talk to someone who likely knows how you’re feeling and may have the answer! You do need to complete the form before the end of October.

 

This university should support you in thriving both academically and socially, so make sure you access and use the full range of services available, and if there’s something missing, don’t be afraid to ask for it.

Remember, even if you might not feel like you fit in to the university community immediately, you still have the right to take up space in being unapologetically yourself!

Find your Balance

You’ve likely heard by now that uni is a great place to try new extracurricular activities and continue with the things that you’re passionate about. We’ve got you covered at Bristol with a huge array of options so that you can strike the right balance between your studies and making the most of being a Bristol student.

Due to COVID-19 you’ll see a lot of these events and activities have gone virtual this year. There’s still much to enjoy on campus and we’ve made some changes to enable you to get involved safely, such as adapting our spaces and enhanced hygiene measures.

Explore societies, volunteering & much more at the SU Welcome Fair

Held on 7 October 12 pm – 8 pm, the Official Bristol SU Welcome Fair is going virtual for 2020 with registration opening on Monday 14 September.

At the virtual fair you’ll be able to chat to stallholders live online using the interactive chat, sign up to sports clubs and societies and look into volunteering projects. It’s a great way to find out more about Bristol SU and as an added bonus, commercial stallholders will be giving out freebies and discount codes!

Sport – there’s something for everyone

Sport and exercise can have a hugely positive impact on your student experience. It’s not only a great way to stay active and healthy, it can also improve your mental wellbeing, be a great way to meet new people, improve your confidence and help you learn new skills. There are 70+ Sports Clubs and Societies at the University of Bristol, from Performance level sports such as Rugby, Hockey, Tennis, and Rowing – all of which have men’s and women’s or mixed teams – to the more unusual sports including Spike Ball, Synchronised Swimming and Quidditch!

If team-sport isn’t your thing, check out the Indoor Sport Centre on Tyndall Avenue where you’ll find the University Gym and fitness studios. You can book gym sessions and classes online now too via the University of Bristol Sport App.

And, if you’re looking for something a bit more fun, with a bit less commitment, then B:Active might be for you. B:Active is our physical activity programme exclusively for students. The focus is on getting moving, having fun, being social and feeling included.

If your time on campus is going to be limited, make sure to check out the virtual and on-demand fitness classes and events that will be on offer this year from Bristol Uni Sport, and join the #WeAreBristol community from your own home.

Being Well, Living Well toolkit

Take a look at our new Being Well, Living Well toolkit for some great resources on ‘Living Well’, ‘Feeling Well’, ‘Staying Safe’ and ‘Spending Well’. These have been developed by a team of mental health experts, healthcare professionals, university students and staff to equip you with practical tips and tools that will empower you to manage your mental, physical, emotional, and financial wellbeing. It also includes where to seek further help if needed.

“We want you to make the most of your time at university and for you to feel settled and supported. The toolkit has a lot to offer with interactive modules, practice scenarios, student interviews and much more. I’d encourage you to spend some time exploring the resources and feel free to discuss and share with your friends.”

Professor Sarah Purdy, Pro-Vice Chancellor (Student Experience)

The toolkit helps build self-insight and understanding that you are not alone in experiencing challenges. It highlights useful aspects of your student life such as what to expect, adapting to change, how to manage your money, and build healthy relationships.

How to access Being Well, Living Well

You can access the toolkit anytime, using your single sign-on in Blackboard. You will be automatically enrolled a few days after your Blackboard account becomes active, but if you want to access the Being Well, Living Well content sooner you can self-enrol and access it now. Follow the self-enrol link, log in with your University ID and Password and you will be taken to a page with instructions for joining. If you don’t see the self-enrol button then you’re already enrolled. Once enrolled, you can find the Being Well, Living Well materials on the Blackboard homepage under the My Organisations section.

Spend some time looking through the toolkit to help you feel settled and successfully navigate your new uni life.

Chill out in an SU Living Room

The SU Living Rooms are a space to relax and unwind either on your own or with friends. You’ll find one on the fourth floor of Senate House plus four more in halls of residence. Follow the link and join the online living room to connect with others right now, ask any questions and have fun in one of the many events that are planned.

Get to know Bristol

Keep an eye on our social channels next week for lots more about ‘Bristol Living’ and tips on places to explore. Bristol has all the perks of city life with wide open green spaces only a short distance away – much within walking distance or a short bus ride. The entire city is bursting with culture, flavours, music and opportunities to get involved – you will never be short of ways to Find your Balance.

“My Bristol community has really come together during this time”

Hi everyone, my name is Michelle and I’m a second year Civil Engineering student.

Never in a million years would I have guessed that I would finish the rest of my academic year online in self isolation because of a global pandemic, but if there is anything these past two months have taught me it’s that, every cloud has a silver lining. From the weekly zoom calls/meetings to the increased online group forums, my Bristol community has really come together during this time.

 

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